Monarch Butterflies

— Written By Deborah Foster and last updated by
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butterfly on bushMonarch Butterflies The N.C. Cooperative Extension, Currituck Center is sponsoring an educational presentation on Butterfly Gardening. The program is scheduled for Thursday June 4th at 1 p.m. at the Currituck Extension Center located at 120 Community Way, Barco, NC. There is no fee, but you must pre-register by calling 252-232-2262 or email deborah_foster@ncsu.edu.

Participants will learn about the monarch butterfly, which once was common across the United States, but could soon end up on the Endangered Species List. By some estimates, the monarch butterfly population has declined by 90 percent over the past two decades, from about 1 billion butterflies in the mid-1990s to just 35 million individuals last winter.

Information will also be shared on how you can get more butterflies to your yard by planting both nectar and host plants for a variety of butterflies here in North Carolina. Pollinators are responsible for assisting over 80% of the world’s flowering plants. Without them, humans and wildlife wouldn’t have much to eat or look at! Join us to learn how you can help save the monarch butterfly as well as encouraging other wildlife in your backyard.

Posted on May 7, 2015
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