Summer Learning Loss

— Written By Teacher helping student

“Often referred to as summer setback or the summer slide, summer learning loss is when students return to school at a lower academic level than the end of the last school year. This happens when your child does not use or practice the skills he or she learned at school during summer vacation.“  This definition according to Oxford Learning describes what often happens to our students. This year, the “summer slide” is very likely to be much worse because of the COVID-19 situation and its effects on the school year ending prematurely. By the end of the summer, many learners will not have been in a formal learning environment for approximately six months.

Participating in summer educational opportunities is critical to reduce the effects of summer learning loss. This year, that is especially challenging because of the limited offerings available. Most camps and other enrichment opportunities are canceled due to the pandemic.

Therefore, I would like to challenge you to be aware of summer learning loss and attack it! Encouraging your child to read, garden, explore, discover hobbies and any activity that has an educational component will certainly help in this struggle.

This problem has been a long time and there are numerous resources available to help you. Here are a few links to N.C. Cooperative Extension resources, a great article from Brookings Institution,  as well as a video that explains more about what it is and how economic situations and differences create disparities.

Combat Summer Learning Loss

Preventing Summer Learning- Loss

Summer Learning Loss

I hope these resources help raise your awareness and motivate you to get involved in providing and encouraging educational opportunities for your child during this very long school break. Be sure to check out online learning opportunities offered by N.C. Cooperative Extension in Currituck County by visiting our website

For more information or questions regarding any Currituck County 4-H activities please contact Billy Caudle at (252) 232-2262 or by email at billy_caudle@ncsu.edu.