What Do Your Surroundings Say About You?

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teenage in messy bedroom

What is the message you give to people when they come to your house or your room and it is a complete disaster? Bed not made, clothes all over the place, dirty dishes scattered about, in desperate need of a vacuum, and what is that smell??

It might say that you are messy, lazy and just don’t care about your room or your home. It might also say that you are creative and a free spirit! Your surroundings say a lot about you. While most of us have never been accused of being neat freaks, we would agree that it is much easier to accomplish tasks and goals if we are somewhat organized.

That is what is important here – getting things done. So I am linking two ideas together – being organized, and getting things accomplished. As we spend more time at home – working from home, virtual schooling, virtual meetings, etc. this idea has become more relevant. For most of us, they go hand in hand. For others, not so much.

According to Molly Pennington Ph.D. in a February 2017 Reader’s Digest article, there are merits to being a “messy” person that include being creative, an ability to not sweat the small stuff, and being spontaneous and flexible. This article makes me feel better about being a little cluttered and is a good read. It points out that your system must work for you.

Another view eloquently expressed by Admiral William H McRaven, Commander of US Special Operations Command at the University of Texas – Austin 2014 commencement speech states that “if you make your bed every morning, you will have accomplished the first task of the day. It will give you a small sense of pride and it will encourage you to do another task, and another, and another. And by the end of the day, that one task completed will have turned into many tasks completed. Making your bed will also reinforce the fact that the little things in life matter. If you can’t do the little things right, you’ll never be able to do the big things right. And if by chance you have a miserable day, you will come home to a bed that is made. That you made. And a made bed gives you encouragement that tomorrow will be better. So if you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.”

So, today I want to challenge you to take a look at your surroundings and decide if you need to make a change. If you do need a change, I encourage you to take the steps you need to take to get better organized –  in your own way –  in order to better accomplish your goals. If you don’t need to make a change, that is great too! I challenge you to help others get where you are.

Messy People

University of Texas at Austin 2014 Commencement Address – Admiral William H. McRaven

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