CCRC Closed to Horses Until April 1, 2021

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Currituck County Rural Center

Due to a recent case of equine strangles in the area and upon guidance from the state veterinarian, the Currituck County Rural Center is under quarantine until April 1, 2021. While no infected animals are known to have entered the property, strangles is highly contagious among horses. No equines are permitted on the property until the quarantine has been lifted. This includes all scheduled horse shows for the month of March. The park remains open to visitors as humans and pets are not at risk.

Strangles is a respiratory illness of horses caused by the bacteria Streptococcus equi. The infection is localized to the upper respiratory system most commonly is noted by significant swelling behind the lower jaw and along the sides of the face. Horses with strangles also typically have a greenish-yellow mucus discharge from their nostrils. Other symptoms include lack of appetite, high fever, wet cough, and strained breathing.

If you have questions or need more information, please contact Tom Harrell at 252-232-2262 or email tpharrel@ncsu.edu.