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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

NC Cooperative
Extension Service Announces Strategic Plan

The Cooperative Extension Service at NC State outlines its vision for restructuring over the next 22 months by targeting its strengths and improving access to services across the state.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

NC Cooperative
Extension Service Announces Strategic Plan

The Cooperative Extension Service at NC State outlines its vision for restructuring over the next 22 months by targeting its strengths and improving access to services across the state.

READ THE REST »
Munsell color book being used to determine the hue, value and chroma of a soil.

Soil 101: Introduction
to Soil – Online!

Understanding soil is a basic skill needed by anyone interested in agriculture, environmental science, gardening, natural resource management, and water quality. Traditionally, to gain that skill, a person has had to pay college tuition and spend long hours in a classroom. Now, with the power of the internet at your fingertips, the NC Cooperative Extension Service is bringing a first class Introduction to Soil education to your office, dining room table, or local coffee shop. Learn more about this open online course at http://go.ncsu.edu/introduction-to-soil

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90s-1

Currituck Extension
1990-1999

In the 1990s the United States was entering the age of the internet and the pace of change grew ever quicker.  What had formerly been called the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service changed its name to what is today known as the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service.  Currituck continued to see growth in real estate, population and tourism throughout the 90s.    As with any growth, there were challenges as well.  Farms continued to decline in number while growing in size.  Teen pregnancy and risk behaviors among teens were on the rise.  Child care needs were increasing as single parent households and numbers of households with both parents working outside the home continued to grow.   Again, Cooperative Extension, armed with research and resources from NC State had the expertise and personnel to address many of these needs.  Agents and staff serving during this decade included: Rodney Sawyer, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, Alice Chatman, Al Wood, MarySue Wright-Baker, Kathy Pollock, Sandra Conner, Patricia Stokes, Tommy Grandy, Joy Davis, Brenda Macioce, Tiffany Riddick, Corey Tate, Steve Wentz, Michelle Brake, Ellen Owens, Danelle Barco, Mary Rogers, Phil Whalen, Deanna Crook, Donna Keene, Van Keane, Michelle Cabrera, Timothy Clune, Angela Coffey, Kristy Serrano and Ellen Payne.   Agricultural initiatives continued to include traditional methods like variety trials and field days but also expanded into home horticulture.  The Extension Master Gardener Program was introduced in the 90s and continues to thrive today.  Another agriculture program with its roots in the 90s that continues today is the pesticide container recycling program.  This helped farmers and agriculture workers be even better stewards of the environment they rely so heavily upon. Family and Consumer Sciences initiatives responded again to changing family dynamics and issues.  Cooperative Extension was instrumental in establishing the Albemarle Area Smart Start Partnership to enhance training and certification for child care centers.  Extension began offering low cost first aid and CPR certification for child care providers.  Health fairs were organized and elder programs were initiated.   The 4-H program began addressing youth issues through several grant-based programs.  The Currituck 4-H Support Our Students program was developed and decreased the incidence of disciplinary referrals while providing middle school youth a safe, supervised place to go after school.  The Currituck 4-H Friends of Youth program provided trained mentors for troubled youth to help get them back on the right path toward productive living.  The first state 4-H officer from Currituck County, Julie Roberts was elected and served.  Finally, 4-H moved back toward the schools offering research-based, free resources for teachers to use in their classrooms.   The 90s were again a meaningful decade of growth for Cooperative Extension.  In 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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growing our state

Currituck Extension
1970-1979

As the United States was preparing to celebrate her bicentennial in the 1970’s, Cooperative Extension in Currituck County was celebrating firsts and milestones as well.  Agents and staff serving during this decade included: Minton Small, Louise Capps, Faye Thorpe, Linda Nash, Judy Lathan, Jerry Hardesty, Sharron Sanderson, Vernon Garrett, Alice Chatman, Lenore Ferrell, Ronnie Spach, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, MarySue Wright-Baker, and Rodney Sawyer . The population of Currituck County in 1970 was nearly 7000 and had risen to nearly 10,000 by 1975.  There was a great deal of outmigration due to local job shortages.  About 1 in 3 Currituck County workers commuted to jobs outside the county.  Another 1 in 3 Currituck County workers were employed in agricultural jobs.  The chief source of agricultural income was from swine in the 1970’s.  During this decade, Currituck County had over 100,000 hogs.  Many of the issues identified in the 1970’s centered around limited recreational opportunities for youth, the need for additional nutrition education for low income families, and better waste management practices among farmers. Following very organized and systematic assessments of community needs, Extension staff in Currituck went to work applying research based information to meeting identified needs.  Agriculture agents promoted soil testing and better soil management to decrease the need for additional fertilizers.  Agricultural marketing education led to more “pick your own” operations and roadside produce markets. The EFNEP (Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program) was introduced to provide nutrition and financial education to low income families in Currituck County.  Energy conservation programs were implemented to teach homemakers how to minimize home energy costs and stretch household dollars.  Child development education was conducted to improve parent child relationships in this new era where families were separated for the vast majority of the day. In 1975, A.B. Coleman donated 140 acres over a 10 year, no cost lease to Currituck County 4-H for the development of a camp for young people and their families.  Thousands of Currituck County youth learned to swim, became acquainted with 4-H, found a recreational outlet and developed an appreciation for the beauty that is Currituck thanks to “Camp Coleman.”  Enrollment in and support for 4-H soared.  Donations allowed for the purchase of a 4-H bus to transport children throughout the county to the camp.  In the absence of a county recreation department, 4-H led the way in providing meaningful and healthy activities for the youth of Currituck County.  Camp Coleman offered swimming, sailing, canoeing, tennis, softball, archery, volleyball, basketball, shuffleboard, horse shoes, primitive camping, a horseback riding ring, bathhouse and pier.  As with all 4-H activities and programs, it was open to and utilized by all youth regardless of race, income or social status. Since the seventies, Camp Coleman has closed, but Currituck 4-H continues to offer summer camp activities available to all the county’s youth.  Agriculture programs still promote environmental sustainability and increased profitability.  Family and Consumer Sciences continue to help families establish healthy lifestyles and stretch financial resources. The bottom line, in 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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1980-89

Currituck Extension
1980-1989

When reminiscing about the 1980’s, most Americans recall big hair, MTV, sitcoms, electronics and overall materialism and the fight for the “American Dream.”   Currituck wasn’t much different.  The number of farms and farm workers began to decline.  Women were the fastest growing group entering the labor force.  Latch-key kids became a very popular occurrence in Currituck and nationwide.  Heart disease was recognized as a leading cause of death for Currituck residents.  Currituck began to see a major influx of population from southern Virginia, bringing with them expectations of additional services. Needs were as critical as ever and Cooperative Extension, armed with research and resources from NC State had the expertise and personnel to address many of these needs.  Agents and staff providing expertise during this decade included: Jerry Hardesty, Sharron Sanderson, Vernon Garrett, Alice Chatman, Lee Ferrell, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, Rodney Sawyer, Al Wood, MarySue Wright-Baker, Carla Chalk, Dwan Saunders (Craft), Faye Edge, Betty Mitchell, Sparkle Voliva, Sandra Conner, Kim Hines, and Kathy Pollock. Due in large part to the vital role Extension had played in the development and improvement of Currituck County, the 1980’s saw an increase and expansion of programmatic efforts as well as staff.  Through a vast system of advisors that represented every community and clientele group, needs were identified that Currituck Extension had the capacity to address.  Innovative programs were developed and implemented  to combat the needs identified and to continue to improve the quality of life in Currituck.  Extension was looked to as a leader in developing new county-wide initiatives such as establishing a centralized water system, an agribusiness council and leading legislative tours.  Extension also facilitated the establishment of the Currituck 4-H Foundation, a non profit organization to support 4-H programming efforts locally. Agricultural initiatives focused on encouraging soil sampling and use of soil reports for appropriate fertilizer use.  New alternative agriculture such as grapes, beach grass, ornamentals and aquaculture were promoted by Extension educators and began to emerge.  Scouting schools were organized to teach farmers to identify pest trends and more appropriately utilize insecticides. Family and Consumer Science initiatives responded to changing family dynamics and new health trend data.  Programs were developed for parenting education, child care provider training as well as senior adult and aging programs.  The Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education program continued to address low income families with nutrition education and strategies for stretching food dollars.  Babysitting certification was conducted to help address the lack of quality child care in Currituck (there were only 5 certified day cares in the 1980’s).  The Eat Right for Life and other nutrition programs were introduced to educate citizens on the importance of making informed nutrition decisions for long term health and wellness.  Stretching dollars and managing family finances was also a major focus. The 4-H program in Currituck rose to a position of prominence throughout the state in the 1980’s.  With the unfortunate loss of Camp Coleman, the 4-H Coastal Capers camp was developed and brought the camping experience to various communities during the summer.  In the first year, 395 campers participated.  After school programs were initiated to address the latch-key kid phenomenon.  Substance abuse, teen pregnancy prevention programs and self esteem programs were developed to give young people tools for addressing many of the pressures they faced.  An international exchange program with Costa Rica was initiated.  Programs promoting personal hygiene, personal appearance, clothing care and self esteem were conducted and culminated with the first county-wide fashion show conducted by program participants. The 80’s were no doubt a fantastic decade for Cooperative Extension.  In 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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NEWS View All
livestock

Albemarle Livestock Show and Sale 2015

If you wish to participate in the Albemarle 4-H Area Livestock Show and Sale, you must notify the Currituck County 4-H staff of your intent by December 31st. For  more information contact Tommy MORE »

Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education Class

The Currituck County Center of North Carolina Cooperative Extension will be sponsoring a pesticide continuing education class at the Currituck County Extension Center, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 MORE »

CookingShowWinners2o14

Currituck 4-H Hosts Event for Youth “Top Chefs”

Twelve children participated in Currituck County 4-H’s Inaugural Cooking Show which was held on October 9 at the Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension building. The children created a variety of delicious MORE »

festival follow up

Currituck Heritage Festival a Down Home Success

It was windy and rainy all around, except for the literal “Spot” in Southern Currituck County. Over 1000 visitors braved the threat of bad weather to attend the Currituck Heritage Festival and celebrate MORE »

santa

Holiday Parade & Tree Lighting popular

Currituck Cooperative Extension in conjunction with Currituck County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #89 would like to invite you to participate in the 22nd Annual Christmas Parade at the Currituck County Center of MORE »

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EVENTS View All
Medicare Counseling at Powells Point Senior CenterTue Nov 4, 2014
10:00 AM - 2:00 PM Where:
Powells Point Senior Center, 8011 Caratoke Hwy, Powells Point, NC, United States
— 3 days away
Coastal NE Daylily Society MeetingTue Nov 4, 2014
10:00 AM - 12:30 PM— 3 days away
Canning -Apple Pie FillingWed Nov 5, 2014
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension-Currituck County Center, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 5 days away
4-H Staff MeetingThu Nov 6, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM— 5 days away
Master Gardener Greenhouse Work DayFri Nov 7, 2014
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM— 6 days away
Open Circuit Horse ShowSat Nov 8, 2014
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM— 1 week away
staff conferenceMon Nov 10, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Where:
conference room
— 1 week away
Moyock ECA Club MeetingMon Nov 10, 2014
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Where:
Moyock Library, Moyock, NC, United States
— 1 week away
More Events