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NC Cooperative Extension Service

North Carolina
Cooperative Extension Celebrates Centennial in 2014

In North Carolina and across the country, 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of Cooperative Extension programs. Extension’s centennial is linked to the signing of the federal Smith-Lever Act, which provided funds for life-changing educational programs. Today, Cooperative Extension programs in North Carolina are based in all the state’s 100 counties and on the Qualla Boundary of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. These programs draw on research-based knowledge from the state’s land-grant universities -- N.C. State University and N.C. Agricultural and Technical State University – to provide education to citizens. In Currituck County, Cooperative Extension will celebrate the centennial by sharing highlights of Extension over the years in Currituck County, hosting a Centennial Ball in November and producing a commemorative e-book.   Visit the county Extension website – currituck.ces.ncsu.edu  -- for updates on local centennial events and celebrations. N.C. Cooperative Extension’s centennial website provides many resources that tell the 100-year history of this organization. Visit ncce100years.ces.ncsu.edu to see a timeline of Extension milestones, historic photos, examples of Extension programs “Then and Now,” the history of the Smith-Lever Act and much more. Throughout the past 100 years and earlier, the organization now called North Carolina Cooperative Extension has served the state well – helping farmers overcome pests like the boll weevil and learn ways to increase crop yields, educating rural families and helping bring electricity to the state, assisting during times of war and disaster, helping families to provide safe, healthy meals and encouraging youth to develop skills that made them better citizens. Today, Cooperative Extension continues this important role, serving communities and families, supporting agriculture and empowering youth to be leaders. Today, extension agents help connect consumers with food produced in their communities, help families to embrace a healthy lifestyle and engage youth in science, technology, engineering and math studies. Even before the Smith-Lever Act, agricultural extension work had begun in North Carolina. In 1907, C.R. Hudson came to North Carolina to begin the work of agricultural extension from Statesville. Hudson appointed James A. Butler the first county agent, and soon farm demonstration work was under way in seven other counties: Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Mecklenburg, Union, Cabarrus and Rowan. Butler worked with J.F. Eagles and other Iredell County farmers on field demonstrations to teach better methods of growing corn and cotton, two commodity crops that continue as North Carolina staples today. Farmers were fighting to save cotton from the boll weevil, and farm demonstrations helped them to overcome this destructive insect pest. R.E. Jones, who first served as an agricultural agent for African-American farmers, became the first full-time African American 4-H leader in 1936. Jones went on to become the top administrator for Cooperative Extension at N.C. A&T State University from 1943 to 1977; the first African American inducted into the N.C. Agricultural Hall of Fame; and the first African American to serve on the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy, the panel that sets the national extension agenda. In the early 1900s, leaders like I.O. Schaub and Jane S. McKimmon began programs for boys and girls that were the precursors to today’s 4-H youth development program. The same programs attracted the attention of rural parents who started asking for similar education programs of their own. At N.C. State University today, buildings are named for both McKimmon and Schaub. Schaub was leader of the state’s Corn Clubs for boys. Corn Club members planted an acre of corn using scientific methods, and many would double or triple the corn yields of their fathers. Throughout the South, adult farmers began to request seed corn from these junior farmers, hoping to see similar results in their next crops. As Corn Club members began to earn their own spending money, girls also were looking for opportunities to earn spending money for clothing and school books. McKimmon became the first woman to lead the girls’ Tomato Clubs in North Carolina. Tomato Club members would cultivate tomatoes on 1/10 of an acre, and these young women would sell fresh tomatoes during the summer and preserve the surplus by canning for use year round. In the program’s first year, 416 girls canned nearly 80,000 jars of food. Mothers and daughters worked together on canning food, and soon the mothers asked for their own clubs. McKimmon also helped establish the first Home Demonstration Clubs for women. In addition to learning basic skills for running a home, the clubs provided valuable service to their communities – feeding the sick during the 1918 flu pandemic, providing early hot lunches in schools, supporting the war effort through collection drives and by promoting Victory Gardens. North Carolina’s literacy efforts received an early boost when Home Demonstration Clubs brought bookmobiles, and later public libraries, to their communities. The legacy of Cooperative Extension is its history of helping move North Carolina forward over the past 100 years. North Carolina remains the progressive state it is today, thanks in part to the hard work of Cooperative Extension professionals and volunteers. Watch the website for centennial news -- ncce100years.ces.ncsu.edu -- and visit your county extension center’s website for local events: currituck.ces.ncsu.edu.  “Written by Natalie Hampton, CALS Communications, N.C. State University; Provided by Cameron Lowe, N.C. Cooperative Extension, Currituck”

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

North Carolina
Cooperative Extension Celebrates Centennial in 2014

In North Carolina and across the country, 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of Cooperative Extension programs. Extension’s centennial is linked to the signing of the federal Smith-Lever Act, which provided funds for life-changing educational programs. Today, Cooperative Extension programs in North Carolina are based in all the state’s 100 counties and on the Qualla Boundary of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. These programs draw on research-based knowledge from the state’s land-grant universities -- N.C. State University and N.C. Agricultural and Technical State University – to provide education to citizens. In Currituck County, Cooperative Extension will celebrate the centennial by sharing highlights of Extension over the years in Currituck County, hosting a Centennial Ball in November and producing a commemorative e-book.   Visit the county Extension website – currituck.ces.ncsu.edu  -- for updates on local centennial events and celebrations. N.C. Cooperative Extension’s centennial website provides many resources that tell the 100-year history of this organization. Visit ncce100years.ces.ncsu.edu to see a timeline of Extension milestones, historic photos, examples of Extension programs “Then and Now,” the history of the Smith-Lever Act and much more. Throughout the past 100 years and earlier, the organization now called North Carolina Cooperative Extension has served the state well – helping farmers overcome pests like the boll weevil and learn ways to increase crop yields, educating rural families and helping bring electricity to the state, assisting during times of war and disaster, helping families to provide safe, healthy meals and encouraging youth to develop skills that made them better citizens. Today, Cooperative Extension continues this important role, serving communities and families, supporting agriculture and empowering youth to be leaders. Today, extension agents help connect consumers with food produced in their communities, help families to embrace a healthy lifestyle and engage youth in science, technology, engineering and math studies. Even before the Smith-Lever Act, agricultural extension work had begun in North Carolina. In 1907, C.R. Hudson came to North Carolina to begin the work of agricultural extension from Statesville. Hudson appointed James A. Butler the first county agent, and soon farm demonstration work was under way in seven other counties: Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Mecklenburg, Union, Cabarrus and Rowan. Butler worked with J.F. Eagles and other Iredell County farmers on field demonstrations to teach better methods of growing corn and cotton, two commodity crops that continue as North Carolina staples today. Farmers were fighting to save cotton from the boll weevil, and farm demonstrations helped them to overcome this destructive insect pest. R.E. Jones, who first served as an agricultural agent for African-American farmers, became the first full-time African American 4-H leader in 1936. Jones went on to become the top administrator for Cooperative Extension at N.C. A&T State University from 1943 to 1977; the first African American inducted into the N.C. Agricultural Hall of Fame; and the first African American to serve on the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy, the panel that sets the national extension agenda. In the early 1900s, leaders like I.O. Schaub and Jane S. McKimmon began programs for boys and girls that were the precursors to today’s 4-H youth development program. The same programs attracted the attention of rural parents who started asking for similar education programs of their own. At N.C. State University today, buildings are named for both McKimmon and Schaub. Schaub was leader of the state’s Corn Clubs for boys. Corn Club members planted an acre of corn using scientific methods, and many would double or triple the corn yields of their fathers. Throughout the South, adult farmers began to request seed corn from these junior farmers, hoping to see similar results in their next crops. As Corn Club members began to earn their own spending money, girls also were looking for opportunities to earn spending money for clothing and school books. McKimmon became the first woman to lead the girls’ Tomato Clubs in North Carolina. Tomato Club members would cultivate tomatoes on 1/10 of an acre, and these young women would sell fresh tomatoes during the summer and preserve the surplus by canning for use year round. In the program’s first year, 416 girls canned nearly 80,000 jars of food. Mothers and daughters worked together on canning food, and soon the mothers asked for their own clubs. McKimmon also helped establish the first Home Demonstration Clubs for women. In addition to learning basic skills for running a home, the clubs provided valuable service to their communities – feeding the sick during the 1918 flu pandemic, providing early hot lunches in schools, supporting the war effort through collection drives and by promoting Victory Gardens. North Carolina’s literacy efforts received an early boost when Home Demonstration Clubs brought bookmobiles, and later public libraries, to their communities. The legacy of Cooperative Extension is its history of helping move North Carolina forward over the past 100 years. North Carolina remains the progressive state it is today, thanks in part to the hard work of Cooperative Extension professionals and volunteers. Watch the website for centennial news -- ncce100years.ces.ncsu.edu -- and visit your county extension center’s website for local events: currituck.ces.ncsu.edu.  “Written by Natalie Hampton, CALS Communications, N.C. State University; Provided by Cameron Lowe, N.C. Cooperative Extension, Currituck”

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1960-69

Currituck Extension
1960-1969

The 1960’s are often referred to as a tumultuous decade.  The country was in the midst of the civil rights movement; baby boomers were coming of age and experimenting with their independence through everything from music to protests to drugs; we were exploring space, “the final frontier”; and our country was embroiled in the Vietnam War, among many other things.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck remained relevant and continued to bring the University to the people throughout the sixties (and beyond).   Agents and staff leading community efforts during this decade included: Elizabeth Sanderlin (Home Demonstration Agent), Assistant Home Agents, Kay Evans, Paulette Pace, Ann Basnight and Sherrill Taylor; L.A. Powell (Agriculture Agent), Assistant County Agent and then County Chairman, Jerry Hardesty; and Frances Morris, Extension Secretary. Agriculture, Home Demonstration and 4-H work continued to evolve with the times.  Currituck County saw their first two African American Home Demonstration clubs in 1966 in Moyock and Jarvisburg. These and other Home Demonstration Clubs fed over 1000 people during the dedication of the Wright Memorial Bridge.  Extension educational efforts and contacts helped open the North River Jam Kitchen (the first of its kind in North Carolina).  The Jam Kitchen gave homemakers that were selling their produce in roadside stands a way to minimize their losses from over-ripening.  Extension assisted with teaching packaging and production techniques which saved one market alone from losing up to 25 bushels of peaches per day.  Home demonstration work, much like today, emphasized fresh food preservation through proper canning and freezing techniques.  Homemakers were also taught chair caning, furniture refinishing, electrical appliance repair, and other skills to help stretch their dollars. Agricultural efforts turned to teaching improved marketing and production techniques.  Many of the first sophisticated irrigation systems were installed in the sixties.  Farmers were encouraged to dry and store their grains for increased profitability.  Chemical farming began to receive greater focus and education because of the shortage of farm labor.  Agricultural production schools and demonstration plots were utilized to transfer research based information.  The farmers and residents, even then, recognized the need to preserve our fragile ecosystem and the value of tourism to our economy.  As a result, Extension helped lead a “Keep Currituck Green and Clean” campaign which included planting nearly 200 watermelon red Crepe Myrtles in landscapes. Young people in the 1960’s were finding their voice and beginning to speak out.  Currituck County 4-H helped develop these skills through citizenship activities and public speaking instruction and competitions.  Youth also learned and demonstrated proper health, hygiene and nutrition techniques through the annual “Health King and Queen” contests.  In the sixties, princes and princesses were also crowned.  The sixties also saw the beginning of a long standing Currituck 4-H tradition -- the first 4-H Horse and Pony Club and 4-H Horse Show. Since the sixties, “Keep Currituck Green and Clean” has evolved into “Currituck Goes Green,”  an initiative in which Extension takes a lead role.  Horse and pony clubs are still a backbone of our county’s 4-H program.  Home Food Preservation is a key educational effort in 2014.  Farmers still benefit from Expos and demonstration plots.  The bottom line, in 2014, Currituck Extension still works with a diversity of program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens. The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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growing our state

Currituck Extension
1970-1979

As the United States was preparing to celebrate her bicentennial in the 1970’s, Cooperative Extension in Currituck County was celebrating firsts and milestones as well.  Agents and staff serving during this decade included: Minton Small, Louise Capps, Faye Thorpe, Linda Nash, Judy Lathan, Jerry Hardesty, Sharron Sanderson, Vernon Garrett, Alice Chatman, Lenore Ferrell, Ronnie Spach, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, MarySue Wright-Baker, and Rodney Sawyer . The population of Currituck County in 1970 was nearly 7000 and had risen to nearly 10,000 by 1975.  There was a great deal of outmigration due to local job shortages.  About 1 in 3 Currituck County workers commuted to jobs outside the county.  Another 1 in 3 Currituck County workers were employed in agricultural jobs.  The chief source of agricultural income was from swine in the 1970’s.  During this decade, Currituck County had over 100,000 hogs.  Many of the issues identified in the 1970’s centered around limited recreational opportunities for youth, the need for additional nutrition education for low income families, and better waste management practices among farmers. Following very organized and systematic assessments of community needs, Extension staff in Currituck went to work applying research based information to meeting identified needs.  Agriculture agents promoted soil testing and better soil management to decrease the need for additional fertilizers.  Agricultural marketing education led to more “pick your own” operations and roadside produce markets. The EFNEP (Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program) was introduced to provide nutrition and financial education to low income families in Currituck County.  Energy conservation programs were implemented to teach homemakers how to minimize home energy costs and stretch household dollars.  Child development education was conducted to improve parent child relationships in this new era where families were separated for the vast majority of the day. In 1975, A.B. Coleman donated 140 acres over a 10 year, no cost lease to Currituck County 4-H for the development of a camp for young people and their families.  Thousands of Currituck County youth learned to swim, became acquainted with 4-H, found a recreational outlet and developed an appreciation for the beauty that is Currituck thanks to “Camp Coleman.”  Enrollment in and support for 4-H soared.  Donations allowed for the purchase of a 4-H bus to transport children throughout the county to the camp.  In the absence of a county recreation department, 4-H led the way in providing meaningful and healthy activities for the youth of Currituck County.  Camp Coleman offered swimming, sailing, canoeing, tennis, softball, archery, volleyball, basketball, shuffleboard, horse shoes, primitive camping, a horseback riding ring, bathhouse and pier.  As with all 4-H activities and programs, it was open to and utilized by all youth regardless of race, income or social status. Since the seventies, Camp Coleman has closed, but Currituck 4-H continues to offer summer camp activities available to all the county’s youth.  Agriculture programs still promote environmental sustainability and increased profitability.  Family and Consumer Sciences continue to help families establish healthy lifestyles and stretch financial resources. The bottom line, in 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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1940s

Currituck Extension
1940-1949

In the 1940’s the nation was consumed by the second World War and recovering from the Great Depression. Cooperative Extension work in Currituck County focused largely around these two current events of the time.  Agents leading community efforts during this decade included Virginia Brumsey, Kathleen Snyder, and Margaret M. Bray (Home Demonstration Agents), L.A. Powell (Agriculture Agent), and Assistant County Agents Vernon Reynolds and J.E. Mewbern. Extension Agents utilized the vast network of Extension clubs to establish wartime committees to lead and provide structure for emergency programs.  Club women and 4-H members staffed observation posts, collected scrap metal, paper, rubber and fat, organized social events for soldiers and made garments for the Red Cross while the men were away at war.  Farms, which produced largely truck crops such as beans, potatoes, cabbage and tomatoes struggled to find enough labor during the harvest.  As a result, schools altered their schedules so that farm children could be home early enough to help in the fields. Increasing food production and preservation was major focus of Extension programming.  “Victory Gardens” were established to feed families and communities.  Homemakers were taught pressure and water bath canning techniques by Extension educators.  In 1940 alone these efforts resulted in 25,000 quarts of fruits and vegetables canned.  The mantra that accompanied Extension publications and meeting announcements was, “waste nothing, collect everything for victory!”  Currituck citizens responded to the calls to action. In 1942, 75,000 pounds of scrap metal were collected; as were 31,000 pounds of rubber. Fifty-nine 4-H club members along with 300 home demonstration club members served around the clock at observation posts throughout the county. The economic situation during the early 40’s was desperate across the nation and Currituck was no different.  Extension educators led a large scale program that utilized surplus cotton to make mattresses for needy families.  Communities bound together to help their neighbors in need, producing 856 mattresses in 1940 and 1240 more in 1941. Mattress making centers were located throughout the county with the largest being located at the historic courthouse in Currituck. In 1945 the Extension Advisory board was created (a concept that still exists today) to direct effective program planning representative of the needs of county residents. Improving diets, food preservation and preparation and overall health were also cornerstones of Extension programming. The Health King and Queen contest was begun for 4-H members in all of Currituck County schools.  Participants kept health records that were reviewed by community doctors serving as judges to crown the county health King and Queen. In the 40’s, Currituck 4-H members were taught animal husbandry and entrepreneurial skills through the Albemarle Area Livestock program (then called the “fat stock show”). Currituck youth raised, cared for trained and exhibited steers in a regional contest.  These animals were then sold for profit.  The Albemarle Area Livestock Show and Sale is still active today and takes place on the last Tuesday and Wednesday in April each year. In 2014, Currituck Extension still works to improve farms, food and youth development. Improving health by addressing nutrition and local foods production is now a major program focus.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation

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1950-59

Currituck Extension
1950-1959

During the fabulous fifties, the nation was coming out of the second World War and soldiers had returned home to a new era of prosperity.  Technology innovations were on the rise.  Cooperative Extension work in Currituck County began to take on a broader focus as homes and farms became more diversified.  Agents leading community efforts during this decade included Elizabeth Sanderlin (Home Demonstration Agent), L.A. Powell (Agriculture Agent), Assistant County Agents Vernon Reynolds and J.E. Mewbern and Assistant Home Demonstration Agents Evelyn Creekmore, Maidred Morris and Lou Ann Alphin.  The Home Demonstration staff worked with families and 4-H Club girls while the County Agent Staff worked with farmers and 4-H Club Boys. Home demonstration work was very focused on health, maintaining economic prosperity and fostering cohesive and highly functioning communities.  Because economic prosperity was on the rise, club women took the lead in contributing to many charitable causes.  They continued to raise funds for, purchase and build community buildings adding Jarvisburg and the Shawboro Community Building in the 1950’s.  These Extension groups also worked to raise awareness of and fund research for cancer, polio, TB and promote donations for the Red Cross blood mobile. Club women purchased and donated flags, staffs and stands to all the schools in Currituck County.  They continued to offer the county-wide picnic and assisted with the opening of the County Health Department. Home Demonstration Staff taught classes on meal preparation, modern laundry methods, improving crafts for home use and sale and improving family life.  Women throughout the county began using skills taught through Extension work to supplement their family’s income and continue to improve the quality of their lives.  Efforts included farm market enterprises to craft exchanges to producing value added products like jams and preserves.  Family life throughout the county was improved through efforts promoting shared activities, mental health and even adoption.  Demonstrations highlighting home management techniques such as wood floor maintenance were conducted in homes throughout the county. The 1950’s saw Currituck’s agricultural efforts begin to shift from truck crops to corn and soybean production.  Many farmers also began to seek employment off the farm in civil service jobs in nearby areas.  Major crops and livestock in Currituck in the 1950’s included corn, soybeans, peanuts, hogs, beef cattle, peaches, berries, sweet potatoes, irish potatoes and poultry. County Agent Staff provided research based education in agriculture engineering promoting: diesel engines, grain bins, dryers and water management.  Thanks to educational efforts of Extension staff, Currituck livestock producers were recognized statewide as possessing some of the best and greenest pasture lands in this portion of the state.   Continued education in best practices of crop and livestock management utilizing farm tours throughout the county was also conducted.  Extension agents also began providing education in forest and timber management. In brief, 4-H projects in the 1950’s were entrepreneurial and promoted youth leadership.  Club girls were making and selling clothing and crafts and raising and selling poultry and eggs.  Club boys were learning tractor maintenance; raising and marketing livestock and vegetable crops; and producing and selling local honey.  Boys and girls alike benefited from programs like farm and home safety, leadership schools, rules for dating classes and recreational programs offered through 4-H.  The county had its first state 4-H long term project record winner, Fay Cox. In 2014, Currituck Extension still works with a diversity of program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  Improving farms, food and youth development are key focus areas of today’s programming.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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NEWS View All
Vaccine Clinic Sept 2014

Fall Haul-In Vaccine and Coggins Clinic

The Currituck County Rural Center will host a fall equine vaccine clinic September 13 from 10am to 2pm. To register please call Tom Harrell 252-232-2262 tom_harrell@ncsu.edu or on-line at: go.ncsu.edu/fallvaccineclinic   We need 10 horses registered MORE »

5K logo

Man Up 5K

Currituck County Cooperative Extension will sponsor the “Man Up 5K” on Saturday, September 6 at the Currituck Extension Center in Barco.   Race sponsors include Towne Bank of Currituck and Albemarle Hospital. Race proceeds MORE »

Run@WorkLogo2014

Run @ Work Day – 5k Run and 1 Mile Walk popular

The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension is happy to announce that the second annual Run @ Work 5k and 1 mile run/walk will be held on Friday, September 19th, 2014 at MORE »

orchids

Growing Orchids Workshop popular

Have you ever wondered why your orchids won’t re-bloom or why they die so quickly? If growing orchids is something you would like to try but don’t know where to start, NC Cooperative MORE »

Happy Trails Horse Camp

Fun At Horse Camp popular

Currituck County Rural Center hosted a 4-H camp for non horse owners on June 17-19, 2014. This camp was for youth ages 8-12 years old. During this three day camp youth learned the MORE »

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EVENTS View All
Currituck Run Club meetingThu Jul 24, 2014 Today
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 6 hours ago
Sand Spurs 4-H Club MeetingThu Jul 24, 2014 Today
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM— 6 hours ago
NC Cooperative Extension on UNC-TV - "Local Foods"Thu Jul 24, 2014 Today
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM— 4 hours ago
4-H Staff MeetingFri Jul 25, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM— 9 hours away
4-H State CampSun Jul 27 - Fri Aug 1, 2014 - ALL DAY Where:
Eastern 4-H Educational Center, Columbia, NC
— 2 days away
4-H Mesowannago Summer Day CampMon Jul 28, 2014 @ 8:30 AM -
Thu Jul 31, 2014 @ 6:00 PM Where:
Griggs Elementary School, 261 Poplar Branch Road Poplar Branch, NC 27965
— 3 days away
4-H Mesowannago Summer Day CampMon Jul 28, 2014 @ 8:30 AM -
Thu Jul 31, 2014 @ 6:00 PM Where:
Shawboro Elementary School, 370 Shawboro Road Shawboro, NC 27973
— 3 days away
Staff MeetingMon Jul 28, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM— 3 days away
More Events