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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

NC Cooperative
Extension Service Announces Strategic Plan

The Cooperative Extension Service at NC State outlines its vision for restructuring over the next 22 months by targeting its strengths and improving access to services across the state.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

NC Cooperative
Extension Service Announces Strategic Plan

The Cooperative Extension Service at NC State outlines its vision for restructuring over the next 22 months by targeting its strengths and improving access to services across the state.

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Fall Vegetables

Fall Gardens and
Local Foods

Your spring and summer gardens may be coming to an end, but that doesn’t mean enjoying fresh, local produce has to.  Some tomato varieties and peppers may continue to produce until colder weather comes and early planted fall gardens will soon to begin to produce their bounty. The hot humid days of late summer sometimes make it very difficult to get seedlings started and growing.  Fortunately, here in eastern North Carolina, the weather will continue to be warm through the fall with the average killing frost usually occurring in early November.  Thus, there are still opportunities to grow vegetables that perform well with the on-set of cooler night time temperatures.  Vegetables that normally do well in the fall and early winter are mainly members of the leafy green crop, such as: leaf lettuces kale* collards* broccoli arugula* spinach* * Are winter hardy and can survive a hard frost and produce into the winter.  Leafy greens are very nutritious and can be a great addition to your meals.  With the exception arugula, which can be planted with seed, vegetative transplants should be used to plant the other leafy vegetables listed above.  Many of the leafy vegetable transplants should be available in garden centers at this time of year. If you are not inclined to fall garden, there are small farms and roadside stands throughout northeast North Carolina that grow and sell locally grown produce.  To find locally grown, fresh produce that is available in Currituck County go to:  http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu/categories/agriculture-food/ then under “Links” click on ‘Small Farms and Roadside Markets’. North Carolina is recognized for its number of small farms across the state and its diversity of agricultural products that are available to consumers.  To determine the availability of local North Carolina agricultural products, visit:  http://www.ncfreshlink.com/achart.htm. To “Be Healthy,” “Eat Healthy”.  Take advantage of late summer and fall fresh produce.  “Make a Choice and Make It Local” by supporting Currituck County local growers and markets.

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growing our state

Currituck Extension
1970-1979

As the United States was preparing to celebrate her bicentennial in the 1970’s, Cooperative Extension in Currituck County was celebrating firsts and milestones as well.  Agents and staff serving during this decade included: Minton Small, Louise Capps, Faye Thorpe, Linda Nash, Judy Lathan, Jerry Hardesty, Sharron Sanderson, Vernon Garrett, Alice Chatman, Lenore Ferrell, Ronnie Spach, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, MarySue Wright-Baker, and Rodney Sawyer . The population of Currituck County in 1970 was nearly 7000 and had risen to nearly 10,000 by 1975.  There was a great deal of outmigration due to local job shortages.  About 1 in 3 Currituck County workers commuted to jobs outside the county.  Another 1 in 3 Currituck County workers were employed in agricultural jobs.  The chief source of agricultural income was from swine in the 1970’s.  During this decade, Currituck County had over 100,000 hogs.  Many of the issues identified in the 1970’s centered around limited recreational opportunities for youth, the need for additional nutrition education for low income families, and better waste management practices among farmers. Following very organized and systematic assessments of community needs, Extension staff in Currituck went to work applying research based information to meeting identified needs.  Agriculture agents promoted soil testing and better soil management to decrease the need for additional fertilizers.  Agricultural marketing education led to more “pick your own” operations and roadside produce markets. The EFNEP (Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program) was introduced to provide nutrition and financial education to low income families in Currituck County.  Energy conservation programs were implemented to teach homemakers how to minimize home energy costs and stretch household dollars.  Child development education was conducted to improve parent child relationships in this new era where families were separated for the vast majority of the day. In 1975, A.B. Coleman donated 140 acres over a 10 year, no cost lease to Currituck County 4-H for the development of a camp for young people and their families.  Thousands of Currituck County youth learned to swim, became acquainted with 4-H, found a recreational outlet and developed an appreciation for the beauty that is Currituck thanks to “Camp Coleman.”  Enrollment in and support for 4-H soared.  Donations allowed for the purchase of a 4-H bus to transport children throughout the county to the camp.  In the absence of a county recreation department, 4-H led the way in providing meaningful and healthy activities for the youth of Currituck County.  Camp Coleman offered swimming, sailing, canoeing, tennis, softball, archery, volleyball, basketball, shuffleboard, horse shoes, primitive camping, a horseback riding ring, bathhouse and pier.  As with all 4-H activities and programs, it was open to and utilized by all youth regardless of race, income or social status. Since the seventies, Camp Coleman has closed, but Currituck 4-H continues to offer summer camp activities available to all the county’s youth.  Agriculture programs still promote environmental sustainability and increased profitability.  Family and Consumer Sciences continue to help families establish healthy lifestyles and stretch financial resources. The bottom line, in 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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1980-89

Currituck Extension
1980-1989

When reminiscing about the 1980’s, most Americans recall big hair, MTV, sitcoms, electronics and overall materialism and the fight for the “American Dream.”   Currituck wasn’t much different.  The number of farms and farm workers began to decline.  Women were the fastest growing group entering the labor force.  Latch-key kids became a very popular occurrence in Currituck and nationwide.  Heart disease was recognized as a leading cause of death for Currituck residents.  Currituck began to see a major influx of population from southern Virginia, bringing with them expectations of additional services. Needs were as critical as ever and Cooperative Extension, armed with research and resources from NC State had the expertise and personnel to address many of these needs.  Agents and staff providing expertise during this decade included: Jerry Hardesty, Sharron Sanderson, Vernon Garrett, Alice Chatman, Lee Ferrell, Jessica Tice, Georgia Kight, Rodney Sawyer, Al Wood, MarySue Wright-Baker, Carla Chalk, Dwan Saunders (Craft), Faye Edge, Betty Mitchell, Sparkle Voliva, Sandra Conner, Kim Hines, and Kathy Pollock. Due in large part to the vital role Extension had played in the development and improvement of Currituck County, the 1980’s saw an increase and expansion of programmatic efforts as well as staff.  Through a vast system of advisors that represented every community and clientele group, needs were identified that Currituck Extension had the capacity to address.  Innovative programs were developed and implemented  to combat the needs identified and to continue to improve the quality of life in Currituck.  Extension was looked to as a leader in developing new county-wide initiatives such as establishing a centralized water system, an agribusiness council and leading legislative tours.  Extension also facilitated the establishment of the Currituck 4-H Foundation, a non profit organization to support 4-H programming efforts locally. Agricultural initiatives focused on encouraging soil sampling and use of soil reports for appropriate fertilizer use.  New alternative agriculture such as grapes, beach grass, ornamentals and aquaculture were promoted by Extension educators and began to emerge.  Scouting schools were organized to teach farmers to identify pest trends and more appropriately utilize insecticides. Family and Consumer Science initiatives responded to changing family dynamics and new health trend data.  Programs were developed for parenting education, child care provider training as well as senior adult and aging programs.  The Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education program continued to address low income families with nutrition education and strategies for stretching food dollars.  Babysitting certification was conducted to help address the lack of quality child care in Currituck (there were only 5 certified day cares in the 1980’s).  The Eat Right for Life and other nutrition programs were introduced to educate citizens on the importance of making informed nutrition decisions for long term health and wellness.  Stretching dollars and managing family finances was also a major focus. The 4-H program in Currituck rose to a position of prominence throughout the state in the 1980’s.  With the unfortunate loss of Camp Coleman, the 4-H Coastal Capers camp was developed and brought the camping experience to various communities during the summer.  In the first year, 395 campers participated.  After school programs were initiated to address the latch-key kid phenomenon.  Substance abuse, teen pregnancy prevention programs and self esteem programs were developed to give young people tools for addressing many of the pressures they faced.  An international exchange program with Costa Rica was initiated.  Programs promoting personal hygiene, personal appearance, clothing care and self esteem were conducted and culminated with the first county-wide fashion show conducted by program participants. The 80’s were no doubt a fantastic decade for Cooperative Extension.  In 2014, Currituck Extension still works with diverse program efforts to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.  The challenges and the landscape have certainly changed over the last 100 years, but the vision remains the same.  Cooperative Extension in Currituck still aspires to empower people to improve their lives through quality, research based information and programs.  For more information on Cooperative Extension, contact the county office at 252-232-2261, visit the website at http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu or email the County Extension Director at cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu. The Currituck County Center of NC Cooperative Extension extends to county residents the educational resources of NC State University and NC A&T State University.  Both universities commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability.  In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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SHIIP logo

What Is Medicare?

Starting this year, one boomer will become eligible for Medicare every eight seconds. Yes, Medicare — the health insurance program administered by the federal government for people 65 and older. If you are approaching, or have just recently passed that milestone, remember that knowledge is power. Medicare can be a welcome birthday present, especially if you take time to understand the different parts of the program and the wealth of health care resources it provides. What is Medicare? Medicare is the federal health insurance program for those 65 and older. It was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in July 1965 as a way to help older adults pay their medical expenses. Over the years, Medicare has been expanded to provide coverage for some younger people with disabilities and people with end-stage kidney disease. In 1986 the Senior Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP) was founded by the Department of Insurance. Counseling sites are located in all 100 counties in North Carolina. At these sites trained volunteers can help you answer most any question related to Medicare and types of Medicare coverage. To find a counseling site near you visit http://www.ncdoi.com/SHIIP/SHIIP_County_Sites.aspx. In 2003, President George W. Bush established Medicare Part D, a program designed to help people with Medicare pay for their prescription drugs. All these programs are still available for those who are eligible. Medicare consists of several plans or "parts": • Parts A and B are often referred to as Original, or Traditional, Medicare. Part A helps pay your hospital bills, and most people have paid for their Part A premiums through payroll taxes while working. Part B helps pay for doctor visits and other medical services, including screenings for heart disease, diabetes and some types of cancer. • Part C plans, also known as Medicare Advantage plans, are Medicare-approved plans offered by private insurance companies. Part C plans are an alternative to Original Medicare. Along with covering doctors and hospitals, they often also cover prescription drugs. • Part D plans are Medicare-approved private plans that help people who have Parts A and B to pay for prescription drugs. Keep in mind that Medicare does not cover all of your health care costs. Services such as routine dental and vision care are not covered by Medicare. Unless you have additional insurance or qualify for low-income assistance, even with Medicare, you will be paying some premiums, deductibles and co-pays. How do you enroll? The best time to enroll in Medicare is during the Initial Enrollment Period which is the three months before, the month of, and three months following your 65th birthday. Not enrolling during this period could cost you a premium penalty. This is also a good time to enroll in a Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug) Plan. You can also receive a premium penalty for not having credible drug coverage. You can look into Medicare advantage or supplemental plans at this time as well. You should contact your local SHIIP Volunteer for advice on any of these plans and for any type of Medicare advice. Once you have enrolled in Medicare you can make changes to your coverage during the Annual Election Period which takes place between October 15th and December 7th each year. You should review your drug plan annually to make sure that your prescriptions are fully covered at the lowest price. You can do that by: • Visit www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan to compare your current coverage with all of the options that are available in your area, and enroll in a new plan if you decide to make a change. • You can also call your local SHIIP counseling site. In Currituck County, this is through the Cooperative Extension Center. To arrange a face to face appointment with one of our trained counselors call 252-232-2262.

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NEWS View All
Run @ Work 2014

2nd Annual Run @ Work held in Currituck popular

The 2nd Annual Currituck County Run @ Work 5k and 1 Mile was held on September 19th, 2014. That beautiful morning over 50 racers of all types lined up to complete the course MORE »

images

Free Fire Safety Class for Childcare Providers popular

NC Cooperative Extension, Currituck County Center is offering a free Fire Safety Class to childcare providers. The workshop will be held on Monday, October 20th at the Currituck Extension Center from 6:00 – MORE »

growing our state

Small Farms Tour of Local Foods Producers popular

Do you want to learn about local foods production and how to market direct to the public? The demand for locally grown foods is steadily increasing because consumers want fresh, nutritious and safe MORE »

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Canning Apple Pie Filling popular

NC Cooperative Extension Currituck County Center is offering a class on how to can apple pie filling. Participants will experience firsthand what it is like to work with Clear Gel, a starch that MORE »

homegrown-and-handmade

Homegrown and Handmade Contest

Join us for the third annual Homegrown and Handmade contest to be held in conjunction with the Currituck Heritage Festival on Saturday, September 20th from 12:30- 4:00pm. The festival will take place at MORE »

crown

Little Miss Currituck Pageant popular

Deadline to register extended until September 17th  As part of the Currituck Heritage Festival to be held on September 20, 2014, Cooperative Extension’s   4-H Program is sponsoring the Little Miss Currituck/Junior Miss MORE »

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EVENTS View All
Growing Cold Hardy Citrus ProgramThu Oct 2, 2014 Today
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 11 hours away
4-H Horse Bowl PracticeFri Oct 3, 2014
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 2 days away
Open Circuit Horse ShowSat Oct 4, 2014
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM Where:
Currituck County Rural Center, 184 Milburn Sawyer Road, Powells Point, NC 27966
— 2 days away
National 4-H WeekSun Oct 5 - Sat Oct 11, 2014 - ALL DAY— 3 days away
County Health & Wellness MeetingTue Oct 7, 2014
8:15 AM - 10:00 AM— 5 days away
Healthy Foods Show - Youth Demonstrate Cooking SkillsThu Oct 9, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 1 week away
Oh Sew What 4-H Club MeetingSat Oct 11, 2014
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Where:
NC Cooperative Extension, 120 Community Way, Barco, NC 27917
— 1 week away
staff conferenceMon Oct 13, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Where:
conference room
— 2 weeks away
More Events