How to Write a Hand-Written Thank-You Note

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thank-you note

When was the last time you sat down and wrote a thank-you note? For some, it might have been our graduation, wedding shower, or baby shower. For others, it could have been after that important job interview. Whether you were thanking someone for a gift or using the gesture as a tactic to stand out from the crowd, it is important to remember to thank that person that has shown kindness, given a gift, or given you their time. In today’s world of social media, I see lots of people sending kind gestures on Facebook, but nothing beats a handwritten note to simply say “thanks.” 

Jeanne Field from Hallmark has produced an outstanding article with tips on how to write a thank-you note. She states that the hardest part of writing a thank-you note is just getting started. To help, she shared some tips and a simple thank-you letter template that I have summarized below.

Who:

Make a list of everyone you need to thank. If you have graduated and several people gave you gifts, keep a list of who gave what so you can remember who to thank. 

What:

That list you are making with the who, make sure you list what that person gave you. So you can thank the correct person for the correct gift. You can even add a sentence adding what you will do with the gift. For instance: “Thank you so much for the money, I plan on using it towards a computer for college.” 

When:

It is best to send your thank-you notes relatively quickly. A good rule is to send your notes out within a month of receiving the gift. If it is later than that you can briefly apologize by saying  “I’ve been meaning to tell you…”

This is a simple template on how to write a thank-you note. 

  1. Greeting – identify the person you are thanking. “Dear Aunt Sally”
  2. Express your thanks – start with what you really want to say. “Thank you so much for…”
  3. Add specific details. Tell them how you plan to use or display their gift. “The money you gave will help me outfit my new dorm room.”
  4. Look ahead. Mention any upcoming visits. “I can’t wait to have you for dinner in our new home…”
  5. Restate your thanks. Add specifics to thank them in a different way. “I hope to be able to purchase a quilt I’ve had my eye on. I’ll send pictures when it is all put together.”
  6. End with your regards. Use a closing that reflects your relationship. “Sincerely” might work for an acquaintance, but something a bit more intimate is appropriate for close friends and relatives.

For more information or to review the complete article visit: How to Write a Thank You Note

Finally, there are probably times that you ponder whether or not the action that has been shown towards you is deserving of a thank-you note. Well as a southern girl, my grandmother would say “if the thought crossed your mind, then you probably should.”

For more information or questions regarding any Currituck County 4-H activities please contact Stephanie Minton at (252) 232-2262 or by email at stephanie_minton@ncsu.edu.